The danger of science denial

This, ladies and gentlemen. THIS. Journalist Michael Specter gives an impassioned TED Talk on the danger of science denial. A brilliant talk, and something to be shared as widely as possible. _Especially_ with the anti-science people you know! Vaccine-autism claims, “Frankenfood” bans, the herbal cure craze: All point to the public’s growing fear (and, often, […]

Best cover ever - Space Oddity from the ISS

Legend-of-a-human-being* Commander Chris Hadfield, who (in my view) has been responsible for some of the coolest, most inspiring science communication ever**, has just won everything. Ever. As his goodbye to his time aboard the International Space Station (ISS), Chris recorded a lovely, very heartfelt cover version (with music video) of David Bowie’s classic 1969 ‘Space […]

On the subject of patents

Something encouraging actually happened today in politics for a change. Commerce Minister Craig Foss, who  gets the ‘aimee whitcroft award for most awesome aptronym of the day’, has been listening to NZ’s IT sector on its huge resistance to software being patentable here. And in the wake of that announcement, I figured I’d share a […]

How did feathers evolve?

No doubt you all know by now that fellow Sciblogger and all-around awesomesauce person Siouxsie Wiles has started making some wonderful science videos. If you’ve not already seen and loved them, you can catch them on her YouTube channel - we look forward to the next ones, Siouxsie! And so, in that vein, I thought […]

Who are we without the internet?

‘I’m Paul Miller and I just spent a year without the internet. Can you tell?’ Paul Miller - tech writer for The Verge, amongst other things - has just completed a full year ‘without the internet’. On April 30th 2012, at a minute before midnight, he unplugged his ethernet, wi-fi and stopped using his smartphone […]

A boy and his atom feature in world’s smallest movie

And now for something a little different! IBM, who make Very Clever Machines, have just released “A Boy and His Atom”, the world’s smallest movie. How small? Well, atomic scale. IBM using a tunneling electron microscope (which won IBM a Nobel Prize in 1986) to push carbon atoms around in 242 frames and tell the […]