//

Jawdropping (also ft ICT sector reports, fiscal calculators and Mongolia)

Well, that was my reaction to this video, at any rate. Picked up off Twitter, from fellow Sciblogger Mr David Winter (@TheAtavism) himself*, it’s stunning high-speed camera work explaining the mad physics behind the Prince Rupert’s Drop. Don’t know what that is? Well, watch the video, and the marvel, MARVEL I SAY, at what you’ll learn about glass, strains of different sorts, and more. Also including some very odd, but rather effective, green-screen work.  I’ve [...]

F1000 Research (squeee!), Higgs hyping and string theory

Huzzah, more open science news! Plans were released today for the launch of F1000 Research, an F1000 initiative. F1000, for those for whom the name doesn’t ring a bell, are the ‘Faculty of 1000, which release post-publication peer reviews of scientific literature. They often do big metareviews. And they are, at least to my knowledge, rather well respected. The new F1000 Research service, which will begin publishing later this year, aims to “address three major [...]

You don't like it? Go somewhere else.

Oh, Feynman – you never fail to do other than impress me :) I think this may well turn out to be one of my favourite videos of all time.  In it, brilliant physicist Richard Feynman explains his attitude towards people who, well, doubt science.  Any he explains why he has said attitude. The video includes the wonderful line, Richard gesticulating: You don’t like it? Go somewhere else. To another universe, where the rules are [...]

TOSP Episode 11: November 21st 2011

[Original post on the Sciblogs The Official Sciblogs Podcast site] And we’re back with another new episode of TOSP! This week, aimee and Elf talk of many things, including the winners of this year’s top NZ science award(s), the world’s lightest material, stem cell research, sexism in science (‘womanspace’), a nanocar, still-faster-than-light neutrinos, the casimir effect, and a very special congratulations to one of our Scibloggers (Sciblings)! PODCAST HERE We do hope you enjoy :)  [...]

TOSP Episode 9: November 7th 2011

[Original post on the Sciblogs The Official Sciblogs Podcast site] Greetings, dear listeners! This week, aimee was joined once again by Chelfyn Baxter, co-host of the g33k show, to talk through some of the science stories of the last week.  They included using lasers to rip the universe a new one, Boeing building spacecraft, the weight of the internet, alternate living, radiation-cleaning Aussie nanofibres, asteroids, and some very interesting Sciblogs articles. We apologise (once again, [...]

FTL neutrinos FTW!

* Ahem *  Well, not quite.              (Note: FTL = Faster Than Light) Not entirely, at least. Those of you watching the science news today may have noticed an awful lot of excited wittering about results being published today which suggest the neutrinos may have broken the speed of light. Please note the use of ‘may’ there. First, a brief note on neutrinos themselves.  My favourites of the subatomic particles*, they are virtually massless, seldom interact [...]

Seeing cosmic rays

Like, for real. With the naked eye. Another post courtesy of Josh Bailey*, who has been building cloud chambers and documenting the resulting, well, results. I _meant_ to write on the subject, since it’s so frikkin’ cool, but have been somewhat swamped by other things in which I am involved**. So! Without further ado: —————————— I always find devices that let you observe some basic, not to mention beautiful property of the universe irresistible. And [...]

Physics shorthand

As you may or may not be aware, I have something of a physics Jones. I’ve found the subject interesting ever since school, although I’ll freely admit that my contact therewith has been somewhat intermittent :) Recently, however, and for a slew of reasons, I’ve been getting back into it.  Trying, if nothing else, to fill in my gaping knowledge gaps. While on my trip to the States recently, I got the opportunity to pile [...]

The best view yet of earth's gravity

As a general rule of thumb, I find that anything science-related which makes me shout ‘squeee’ may be something about which I should consider posting. And so, today, I thought I’d share just such a thing. The European Space Agency (ESA) has just released our best map yet of the earth’s gravity, in the form of a ‘geoid’*: what the surface of our ocean might look like under the influence solely of gravity, without the [...]